Rescue
Rescue
Oh Crikey! If I had Croc One when these Sperm Whales stranded maybe they would've had a chance
Saltwater Crocodile Research Gallery

The Irwin family history is steeped in wildlife rescue. My mum was a pioneer of wildlife rehabilitation, my dad, a mad keen herpetologist, and together we have spent our lives rescuing wildlife.

So during my design of Croc One, I knew she’d be doing local and remote wildlife rescues, of both marine and land based wildlife. Rescuing crocs is second nature, but rescuing marine mammals like stranded whales, injured dolphins or orphaned dugongs, is highly specialised and requires a skilled team and specific equipment.

Rescue is a great challenge for Croc One because of the race against time to save injured wildlife, the specialised skills of the on-board crew, and the ever present rough seas. She takes it in
her stride, and will always be there to help - 24 hours a day,
seven days a week. Wildlife can count on her.

Rescue Stories

January 2007 - The Rescue of Trident

The custom built turtle stretcher makes handling a little easierThe custom built turtle stretcher makes handling a little easier!

Talk about being in the right place at the right time! The Croc One crew were out in perfect conditions off Mooloolaba releasing Percy, a Green Sea Turtle when a call came over the marine radio from the local fishing vessel Trident. They had sighted a large floating turtle on their way back into Mooloolaba and were sure she needed some help.

It only took Croc One a few minutes to get to the site and the crew launched the Zodiac to go over for a closer look. Sure enough, this poor turtle had evidence of a boat strike to her carapace and needed veterinary attention. Briano took the dive and quickly wrangled her in time before she swam away, bringing her over to the Zodiac for the crew to lift her in. She was very heavy and it took all hands on deck to get her on board Croc One, then 'Trident' was safely transferred to the Australian Wildlife Hospital where she received expert veterinary care.

Briano takes the dive from Croc One's tender The crew from Trident look on anxiously as the rescue team bring her to the tender Getting this 100kg beauty in the tender called for all the help we could get! All hands on the back deck for transfer on board Croc One
Briano takes the dive from Croc One's tender The crew from Trident look on anxiously as the rescue team bring her to the tender Getting this 100kg beauty in the tender called for all the help we could get! All hands on the back deck for transfer on board Croc One

Kingy The Dolphin

Waiting in the shallows for Veterinary treatment to arrive to treat his injured flippers and nose
Waiting in the shallows for Veterinary treatment to arrive to treat his injured flippers and nose
Briano rescued 'Kingy' the dolphin when he was entangled in shark nets off Kings Beach
Briano rescued 'Kingy' the dolphin when he was entangled in shark nets off Kings Beach

Tanamai the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake

Tanamai the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake: dangerously venomous. At a length measuring nearly one metre, Briano was able to safely tail and bag it on the shore of Dicky Beach and bring it to the Australian Wildlife Hospital for attention.
Tanamai the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake: dangerously venomous. At a length measuring nearly one metre, Briano was able to safely tail and bag it on the shore of Dicky Beach and bring it to the Australian Wildlife Hospital for attention.

Trinity

Wes, Briano and Dr Che reassuring 'Trinity' on the back deck of Croc One before her exciting release!
Tanamai the Yellow-Bellied Sea Snake: dangerously venomous. At a length measuring nearly one metre, Briano was able to safely tail and bag it on the shore of Dicky Beach and bring it to the Australian Wildlife Hospital for attention.